Soil

soil_0.pngHealthy soil is the foundation for healthy food. We promote connections in the local food system that strengthen farm businesses and improve soil health. The Cheshire County Conservation District (CCCD) provides equipment rentals, improved market access, and trainings.

 

 

 

Related Soil Projects

Farm Equipment Rentals

Soil Potential Index & Surveys

NRCS Easement Outreach

Dirt Series

 


 

The Natural and Cultural History of Soil: Cultivating Fertile Soil, Generating Resilient Communities

 

The Natural and Cultural History of Soil is a series of educational events on the theme of soil as the foundation of a healthy food system - - and society. Macarthur Fellow, scientist, and author, Dr. David R. Montgomery, will share his research on the history and future of soil here in the Monadnock region in November, with complimentary events in October leading up to his talks.

Dr. Montgomery will visit from the University of Washington and offer two talks in early November.

Leading up to Dr. Montgomery’s visit there will be a film showing of Dirt! The Movie on October 3rd and facilitated panel and round table book discussion led by Dr. Mark C. Long, Professor of English and American Studies at Keene State College and President of the Association for the Study of the Literature and Environment on October 19th. 

 


 

Upcoming Events in our DIRT SERIES

 

October 3rd @6pm –  Film Screening of  Dirt! The Movie and Facilitated Discussion by Dr. Mark C. Long of Keene State College, Stonewall Farm, 242 Chesterfield Rd, Keene, Parking available on site, to register visit www.cheshireconservation.org/film-screening-dirt-the-movie or contact at 603-756-2988 ext.116 or amanda@cheshireconservation.org

 

October 19th@6pm – Panel and Roundtable Discussion of ideas raised by Dr. David Montgomery’s books Dirt: the Erosion of Civilizations and Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life, Facilitated by Dr. Mark C. Long of Keene State College,  Stonewall Farm, 242 Chesterfield Rd, Keene, Parking available on site, to register visit www.cheshireconservation.org/dirt-series-panel-roundtable-discussion or contact at 603-756-2988 ext.116 or amanda@cheshireconservation.org

 

November 2nd @5pm – NH Association of Conservation Districts Annual Meeting & Working Lands Conference, Keynote by David Montgomery, Courtyard Marriott, 75 Railroad St, Keene, Parking available downtown, $20 ticketed banquet dinner open to public (dinner is included for those attending full conference) to register visit www.cheshireconservation.org/working-lands-conference or contact at 603-756-2988 ext.116 or amanda@cheshireconservation.org

 

November 3rd @11am – Free, Public Talk by David Montgomery – Growing a Revolution, Keene State College Alumni Center, Centennial Hall at the Alumni Center, 229 Main Street, Keene, Parking available on street and limited parking on site, to register visit www.cheshireconservation.org/growing-a-revolution or contact at 603-756-2988 ext.116 or amanda@cheshireconservation.org

 


Supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant, the series of events is sponsored by the Cheshire County Conservation District in partnership with Keene State College. It is a collaborative venture that will further an urgent project at the heart of the environmental humanities: the connection of people, ideas, and the land.   The Conservation District works with the farming community on improving management practices that enhance soil health and viability and to educate the general public on the foundation for a healthy food system.

 

This project poses a series of challenging questions about human culture and agriculture. 

  • What do our current agricultural practices say about us both individually and collectively?
  • How do we understand the social needs and demands of our local agricultural economy, the natural constraints of ecology and the political imperatives of democracy?
  • And how do we reconcile agricultural practices, community health and resiliency, food health and security, with our insatiable consumer economy? 

 

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